Multi-family and Single Family Housing Planning

The City of Windom has an opportunity to approve a 46-unit market rate apartment.  The City hosted 4 community meetings to discuss multi-family and single family housing in Windom. Multiple locations were identified by the public and discussed at community meetings and City Council meeting.  Below is information regarding these meetings. 

Goal: Find a location that works for the developer and the community.

FAQ (Questions Regarding the Market Rate Apartment Project)

Recap: Multi-family Housing Community Meetings

Meetings:

  • November 20th, 2018
  • December 5th, 2018
  • January 16th, 2019
  • January 22nd, 2019 5:30 p.m.

Attachments (new):

Multi-family Housing Meeting #1

Multi-family Housing Meeting #2

Multi-family Housing Meeting #3

Multi-family Housing Meeting #4

Why Multi-family Apartments

Business Growth & Limited Housing

Planning

Why a large apartment vs a smaller unit rental

Citywide Cleanup, Saturday, May 18th

Citywide Cleanup

Saturday, May 18th Only!

Please do not place any items on the curb until Saturday, May 4th.

For information Click Here! 

Watch for updates on this page and also on the back page of the May 4th Shopper.

 

Small Wireless Facility Aesthetic Requirements and Construction Criteria

CITY OF WINDOM, MINNESTOTA

PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY POLICY

Small Wireless Facility Aesthetic Requirements and Construction Criteria

The installation or attachment of an antenna or other wireless communications equipment utilizing small cell technology (the “wireless equipment”) to poles in the City Of Windom or City-owned facilities shall be subject to the criteria set forth below. In some cases, the existing pole may require replacement with a new combination pole that can accommodate the equipment proposed to be attached and the street light luminaire, signal head/mast arm or other appurtenances (the “replacement pole”). If an existing pole is proposed to be utilized for attachment, detailed engineering calculations shall be submitted by a Licensed Professional Engineer showing that the pole can accommodate the additional loads.

A.  Application Process:

  1. The small wireless facility operator or contractor/installer shall submit a permit application(s) to the Windom Building & Zoning Office detailing the type of equipment to be installed, specs regarding weight and size of equipment, photo of cabinet and other equipment to be attached or placed in the City’s right-of-way, and proposed locations for installation of the equipment. The City may request additional information if deemed necessary.
  2. Any fees for the permit application shall be set by resolution of the Windom City Council.

B.  Pole Criteria: 

  1. Specific Criteria:
    1. Only one installation per pole on a first-come, first-served basis is permitted.
    2. If wireless equipment is to be installed on a City-owned street light pole, the operator, at its expense, shall replace the existing street light pole with a chambered pole to segregate wireless and utility services. The specs of the proposed pole shall be approved by the Windom Electrical Department.
    3. The wireless equipment is not permitted to protrude more than five (5) feet above the streetlight luminaire or mast arm itself.
    4. The mounting height of the luminaire on the streetlight pole shall be no more than thirty-five (35) feet.
    5. The mast arm length of a replacement pole shall match the existing streetlight pole being replaced.
    6. The color and surface treatment of the replacement pole shall match the surrounding area poles. Pole heights shall be the same as all surrounding poles of the same use.
    7. No Company signs are permitted to be placed on a pole, including a replacement pole, except to the extent required by local, state or federal laws or regulations.
    8. All pole-attached wireless equipment must be a minimum of ten (10) feet above the sidewalk elevation.
    9. All ground–based wireless equipment including, but not limited to, equipment cabinets or power pedestals shall be placed at the back of the right-of-way whenever possible.
    10. All pole-mounted equipment shall match the color of the pole or replacement pole.
    11. For each individual pole type or style used to support the wireless equipment, one spare replacement pole shall be provided by the small wireless facility operator to the City at the end of the project so that the pole can be replaced promptly in case of a knockdown.
    12. All plans shall be signed and sealed by a Professional Civil and Electrical Engineer.
    13. All other details in the City Of Windom Street Light Design Standards and Engineering Standards shall apply.
    14. The replacement pole and the wireless equipment attached to the pole shall not increase the diameter of the existing pole that is replaced by more than sixty (60) percent, not to exceed eight (8) inches total, or increase the height of the existing pole by more than ten (10) percent, not to exceed four (4) feet. The distance from the edge of the pole to the street or sidewalk shall meet all setback requirements per the City’s Engineering Standards.
    15. Antenna shall be limited to snug-mount, canister-mount, and concealed antennas and mounted no more than six (6) inches off the pole.
    16. All cables or wires for the attached wireless equipment shall be located inside the pole except where such cables or wires attach to the ports in the antenna.
    17. When wireless equipment is attached to a replacement pole, the primary purpose of the pole shall remain as a pole structure supporting a streetlight luminaire, signal mast arms/heads, or power facilities and related fixtures as originally established within the City right-of-way.

C.  Equipment Cabinets

  1. Equipment cabinet locations shall comply with the height and development standards of the underlying zoning district.
  2. Cooling Fans: In residential areas, the small wireless facility operator shall use a passive cooling system. In the event that a fan is needed, the small wireless facility operator shall use a cooling fan with a low noise profile.
  3. The associated equipment will be reviewed by the City for each location and will be screened wherever the same can be screened in a commercially reasonable manner.
  4. No more than one equipment cabinet and/or power pedestal shall be located at and serve any one pole site.

 D.  Above-Ground Utility Structures

  1. When requesting above-ground structures greater than twenty-four (24) inches in height, they must meet the following criteria and the following information must be submitted:
    1. Evidence or documentation that where the above-ground structure is over thirty-six (36) inches in height, given its proposed location, the structure will comply or be in compliance with applicable City Of Windom Zoning Ordinances.
    2. City will provide documentation that identifies a potential site for replacement within a neighborhood. (The site will be selected on the basis of aesthetics and technical/engineering restrictions.)
    3. Evidence that the structure shall be placed on the same side of the right-of-way as refuse containers or utility poles. (The structure shall not block trash truck access and alley access.)
    4. Verification of sight-triangle compliance.
    5. Three (3) photographs of the proposed structure, one (1) at ninety (90) degrees, the other two (2) at forty-five (45) degrees on either side of the proposed location. (Identify the location of the proposed structure, mark the location with white tape, use an orange traffic cone, etc.)
    6. Evidence or documentation of the dimension of the structure.
    7. Evidence or documentation that the structure shall not exceed thirty-six (36) inches in height in front of the front yard of a residential home.
    8. Information as to the specifications of the structure, if available.

E.  Signage/Lights/Logos/Decals: 

  1. Signage: The small wireless facility operator shall post its name, location identifying information, and emergency telephone number in an area on the cabinet of the small cell facility that is visible to the public. Signage required under this section shall not exceed four (4) inches by six (6) inches, unless otherwise required by law (e.g. RF ground notification signs) or the City. If no cabinet exists, the signage shall be placed at the base of the pole.
  2. Lights: New small wireless facilities and wireless support structures shall not be illuminated, except in accord with state or federal regulations, or unless illumination is integral to the camouflaging strategy such as design intended to look like a street light pole.
  3. Logos/Decals: The small wireless facility operator shall remove or paint over unnecessary equipment manufacturer decals. The color shall match or shall be as approved by the City. Small wireless facilities and wireless support structures shall not include advertisements and may only display information required by a federal, state or local agency. The small wireless facility operator shall utilize the smallest and lowest visibility radio frequency (RF) warning sticker required by government or electric utility regulations. Placement of the RF sticker shall be as close to the antenna as possible.

2019 Wellness – Relax – Earn Incentive UPDATE

REMINDER FOR APRIL 16TH AND APRIL 17TH- PEBBLES MASSAGE & SPA  IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS

UPDATE: Spots still available.  Please email Windom.Wellness@windommn.com if you want to reserve a time.   If you already have an appointment, please don’t miss your appointment or be late!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Relax and rejuvenate on your lunch break!!  Jada from Pebbles Massage & Spa will be onsite in Council Chambers giving 10 minute chair massages on April 16th from 12:00-2:00. 

Email Windom.Wellness@windommn.com to reserve your time to relax.  Space is limited. First com first serve!

 

Email Questions to:  Windom.wellness@windommn.com or ask a Wellness Committee member.

Committee: Cheryl Lillegaard, Dawn Aamot, Nancy Sajban, Dana Wallace, Drew Hage, Chelsie Carlson

 

 

2019 March Financial Reports

MAR 2019 Council Summary

 

MAR 2019 Fund Balance Sheet

MAR 2019 Cash_Investment

MAR 2019 Income Statement

MAR 2019 Fund Summary

MAR 2019 General Capital

MAR 2019 Fund Income Statement DETAIL

MAR 2019 Investment Positions

MAR 2019 Special Fund Tracking

 

 

Consumer Confidence Report

Windom

2018 Drinking Water Report

This report contains important information about your drinking water. Have someone translate it for you, or speak with someone who understands it.

Información importante.  Si no la entiende, haga que alguien se la traduzca ahora.

Making Safe Drinking Water

Your drinking water comes from a groundwater source: eight wells ranging from 87 to 142 feet deep, that draw water from the Quaternary Buried Unconfined, Quaternary Buried Artesian and Quaternary Water Table aquifers.

Windom works hard to provide you with safe and reliable drinking water that meets federal and state water quality requirements. The purpose of this report is to provide you with information on your drinking water and how to protect our precious water resources.

Contact Mike Haugen, Water & Wastewater Superintendent, at 507-831-6138 or Mike.Haugen@windommn.com if you have questions about Windom’s drinking water. You can also ask for information about how you can take part in decisions that may affect water quality.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sets safe drinking water standards. These standards limit the amounts of specific contaminants allowed in drinking water. This ensures that tap water is safe to drink for most people. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates the amount of certain contaminants in bottled water. Bottled water must provide the same public health protection as public tap water.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1‑800‑426‑4791.

Windom Monitoring Results

This report contains our monitoring results from January 1 to December 31, 2018.

We work with the Minnesota Department of Health to test drinking water for more than 100 contaminants. In recent years, we found one or more contaminants with levels above the Environmental Protection Agency’s limits. We found some other contaminants in small amounts, but they were below the Environmental Protection Agency’s limits.

Learn more by visiting the Minnesota Department of Health’s webpage Basics of Monitoring and Testing of Drinking Water in Minnesota (https://www.health.state.mn.us/communities/environment/water/factsheet/sampling.html).

How to Read the Water Quality Data Tables

The tables below show the contaminants we found last year or the most recent time we sampled for that contaminant. They also show the levels of those contaminants and the Environmental Protection Agency’s limits. Substances that we tested for but did not find are not included in the tables.

We sample for some contaminants less than once a year because their levels in water are not expected to change from year to year. If we found any of these contaminants the last time we sampled for them, we included them in the tables below with the detection date.

We may have done additional monitoring for contaminants that are not included in the Safe Drinking Water Act. To request a copy of these results, call the Minnesota Department of Health at 651-201-4700 or 1-800-818-9318 between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Definitions

  • AL (Action Level): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
  • EPA: Environmental Protection Agency
  • MCL (Maximum contaminant level): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
  • MCLG (Maximum contaminant level goal): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
  • Level 1 Assessment: A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.
  • Level 2 Assessment: A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.
  • MRDL (Maximum residual disinfectant level): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
  • MRDLG (Maximum residual disinfectant level goal): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
  • NA (Not applicable): Does not apply.
  • NTU (Nephelometric Turbidity Units): A measure of the cloudiness of the water (turbidity).
  • pCi/l (picocuries per liter): A measure of radioactivity.
  • ppb (parts per billion): One part per billion in water is like one drop in one billion drops of water, or about one drop in a swimming pool. ppb is the same as micrograms per liter (μg/l).
  • ppm (parts per million): One part per million is like one drop in one million drops of water, or about one cup in a swimming pool. ppm is the same as milligrams per liter (mg/l).
  • PWSID: Public water system identification.
  • TT (Treatment Technique): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
  • Variances and Exemptions: State or EPA permission not to meet an MCL or a treatment technique under certain conditions.

Monitoring Results – Regulated Substances

LEAD AND COPPER – Tested at customer taps.

Contaminant (Date, if sampled in previous year)

EPA’s Action Level

EPA’s Ideal Goal (MCLG)

90% of Results Were Less Than

Number of Homes with High Levels

Violation

Typical Sources

Copper (07/31/18)

90% of homes less than 1.3 ppm

0 ppm

1.47 ppm

4 out of 20

YES

Corrosion of household plumbing.

Lead (07/31/18)

90% of homes less than 15 ppb

0 ppb

0 ppb

0 out of 20

NO

Corrosion of household plumbing.

 

 

INORGANIC & ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS – Tested in drinking water.

Contaminant (Date, if sampled in previous year)

EPA’s Limit (MCL)

EPA’s Ideal Goal (MCLG)

Highest Average or Highest Single Test Result

Range of Detected Test Results

Violation

Typical Sources

Nitrate

10.4 ppm

10 ppm

0.62 ppm

N/A

NO

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

 

CONTAMINANTS RELATED TO DISINFECTION – Tested in drinking water.

Substance (Date, if sampled in previous year)

EPA’s Limit (MCL or MRDL)

EPA’s Ideal Goal (MCLG or MRDLG)

Highest Average or Highest Single Test Result

Range of Detected Test Results

Violation

Typical Sources

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

80 ppb

N/A

20.6 ppb

N/A

NO

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA)

60 ppb

N/A

8 ppb

N/A

NO

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

Total Chlorine

4.0 ppm

4.0 ppm

1.16 ppm

0.47 – 1.80 ppm

NO

Water additive used to control microbes.

Total HAA refers to HAA5

 

OTHER SUBSTANCES – Tested in drinking water.

Substance (Date, if sampled in previous year)

EPA’s Limit (MCL)

EPA’s Ideal Goal (MCLG)

Highest Average or Highest Single Test Result

Range of Detected Test Results

Violation

Typical Sources

Fluoride

4.0 ppm

4.0 ppm

0.76 ppm

0.66 – 0.74 ppm

NO

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive to promote strong teeth.

 

 

Potential Health Effects and Corrective Actions (If Applicable)

Copper: Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson’s disease should consult their personal doctor.

 

Copper: We are in exceedance of the action level for copper.  Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress.  Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage.  People with Wilson’s Disease should consult their personal doctor.  In response to this issue, we performed a corrosion control study and/or have taken actions to make the water less likely to absorb materials such as copper from your plumbing.

Some People Are More Vulnerable to Contaminants in Drinking Water

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. The developing fetus and therefore pregnant women may also be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water. These people or their caregivers should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1‑800‑426‑4791.

Learn More about Your Drinking Water

Drinking Water Sources

Minnesota’s primary drinking water sources are groundwater and surface water. Groundwater is the water found in aquifers beneath the surface of the land. Groundwater supplies 75 percent of Minnesota’s drinking water. Surface water is the water in lakes, rivers, and streams above the surface of the land. Surface water supplies 25 percent of Minnesota’s drinking water.

Contaminants can get in drinking water sources from the natural environment and from people’s daily activities. There are five main types of contaminants in drinking water sources.

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Sources include sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, pets, and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants include salts and metals from natural sources (e.g. rock and soil), oil and gas production, mining and farming operations, urban stormwater runoff, and wastewater discharges.
  • Pesticides and herbicides are chemicals used to reduce or kill unwanted plants and pests. Sources include agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and commercial and residential properties.
  • Organic chemical contaminants include synthetic and volatile organic compounds. Sources include industrial processes and petroleum production, gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants such as radium, thorium, and uranium isotopes come from natural sources (e.g. radon gas from soils and rock), mining operations, and oil and gas production.

The Minnesota Department of Health provides information about your drinking water source(s) in a source water assessment, including:

  • How Windom is protecting your drinking water source(s);
  • Nearby threats to your drinking water sources;
  • How easily water and pollution can move from the surface of the land into drinking water sources, based on natural geology and the way wells are constructed.

Find your source water assessment at Source Water Assessments (https://www.health.state.mn.us/communities/environment/water/swp/swa) or call 651-201-4700 or 1-800-818-9318 between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Lead in Drinking Water

You may be in contact with lead through paint, water, dust, soil, food, hobbies, or your job. Coming in contact with lead can cause serious health problems for everyone. There is no safe level of lead. Babies, children under six years, and pregnant women are at the highest risk.

Lead is rarely in a drinking water source, but it can get in your drinking water as it passes through lead service lines and your household plumbing system. Windom provides high quality drinking water, but it cannot control the plumbing materials used in private buildings.

Read below to learn how you can protect yourself from lead in drinking water.

  1. Let the water run for 30-60 seconds before using it for drinking or cooking if the water has not been turned on in over six hours. If you have a lead service line, you may need to let the water run longer. A service line is the underground pipe that brings water from the main water pipe under the street to your home.
    • You can find out if you have a lead service line by contacting your public water system, or you can check by following the steps at: https://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/06/24/npr-find-lead-pipes-in-your-home
    • The only way to know if lead has been reduced by letting it run is to check with a test. If letting the water run does not reduce lead, consider other options to reduce your exposure.
  2. Use cold water for drinking, making food, and making baby formula. Hot water releases more lead from pipes than cold water.
  3. Test your water. In most cases, letting the water run and using cold water for drinking and cooking should keep lead levels low in your drinking water. If you are still concerned about lead, arrange with a laboratory to test your tap water. Testing your water is important if young children or pregnant women drink your tap water.
  4. Treat your water if a test shows your water has high levels of lead after you let the water run.

Learn more: