MN PFA Clean Water Land & Legacy – Wastewater Treatment Plant Project Funding

The project consists of advanced treatment improvements to meet nutrient limits, rehabilitation of existing treatment facility components, and CIPP lining of sanitary sewerlines.

MN PFA Project Funding Announcement

The City of Windom has undertaken a comprehensive improvement
project at its Wastewater Treatment Plant. The City has secured
public funding for this project that will reduce the nitrogen and
phosphorus content of its effluent and to better serve the residents
and businesses of the City of Windom.
The contract for the improvement was awarded on January 2, 2019
in the amount of $18,941.979. Funding for the project comes from the
following:

  1. Minnesota Public Facilities Authority $9,624,333 (of which a
    portion comes from US EPA funds);
  2. Point Source Implementation Grant funds $6,317,646 (funding
    appropriated by the Minnesota Legislature from the Clean
    Water Land & Legacy Fund & state general obligation bonds); and
  3. State Appropriation Grant funds awarded by the State
    Legislature $3,000,000. This was previously awarded on October 30, 2018.

More about the Minnesota Public Facilities Authority and its Programs:
The Minnesota Public Facilities Authority (PFA) provides financing and technical assistance to help communities build public infrastructure that protects public health and the environment and promotes economic growth.


Clean Water Revolving Fund (also known as the Clean Water State Revolving Fund or CWSRF):

The CWSRF is supported by federal capitalization grants from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and state matching funds. These funds, together with PFA revenue bond proceeds, are used to make low interest loans to cities throughout the state for wastewater and stormwater infrastructure projects. Loan repayments revolve back to make new loans, providing a permanent source of low-interest capital to help cities finance clean water infrastructure projects. Since its start in 1990,Minnesota’s CWSRF has awarded more than 530 loans for over $3 billion, providing over $667 million in interest savings to local governments and their taxpayers.


Point Source Implementation Grants (PSIG):
The PSIG program provides grants to help cities upgrade water treatment facilities to reduce their discharge of specific pollutants to meet water quality restoration and protection goals.


Economic Growth Leaves Windom Short on Housing

The City of Windom has a shortage of available housing including single-family homes, rental units, and senior housing. 

http://www.keyc.com/story/39727737/economic-growth-leaving-windom-short-on-housing

Apartment Survey

The City of Windom has a shortage of available housing including single-family homes, rental units, and senior housing.  Since 2016, the Windom EDA has been working with a multi-family developer who proposes the construction of a 46-unit market rate apartment building.  The goal is to find a location for the apartment building that works for the developer and the community. 

Survey

Please provide your input in the following Survey regarding potential locations for a 46-unit market-rate apartment building(These locations were identified at the previous community input meetings.) 

Survey Link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/6N2LQ8G

Maps and Information regarding the locations that were included in the survey.

Picture of the potential 46-unit market rate apartment. 

Background

Input from the community has been gathered through our Multi-family Housing Input Meetings, planning meetings for the Windom Comprehensive Plan, individual meetings with community members and City Councilmembers, and at City Council Meetings.   The City held two community input meetings on November 20, 2018, and December 5, 2018, to discuss housing.  The attendees identified potential locations for the new multi-family apartment building. 

Survey Results

Survey results will be discussed at the third community input meeting on Wednesday, January 16th at 5:30 p.m..  Additional locations can also be discussed at this meeting.  The timeline is to have a recommendation for multi-family housing to the Windom City Council by March 2019.   The survey and community input will help City Councilmembers make a decision in March regarding the proposed 46-unit apartment building.

Housing Study

A Comprehensive Housing Study was finalized for the City of Windom in 2014 by Viewpoint Consulting Group.  The Housing Study identified a need for 130 new housing units in Windom from 2014 to the end of the decade.  The Housing Study identified the need for single-family homes, duplexes, quads, and multi-family units to accommodate market-rate housing, seniors, higher-income families, and lower-income families.  The Housing Study was completed prior to Fast Global Solution’s expansion and the opening of Prime Pork creating 500+ new jobs.  As such, since 2014 the housing market has tightened and the demand for units has grown.

Thank you for your participation in this Survey.

Multi-family and Single Family Housing Planning

The City of Windom has an opportunity to approve a 46-unit market rate apartment.  The City hosted 4 community meetings to discuss multi-family and single family housing in Windom. Multiple locations were identified by the public and discussed at community meetings and City Council meeting.  Below is information regarding these meetings. 

Goal: Find a location that works for the developer and the community.

FAQ (Questions Regarding the Market Rate Apartment Project)

Recap: Multi-family Housing Community Meetings

Meetings:

  • November 20th, 2018
  • December 5th, 2018
  • January 16th, 2019
  • January 22nd, 2019 5:30 p.m.

Attachments (new):

Multi-family Housing Meeting #1

Multi-family Housing Meeting #2

Multi-family Housing Meeting #3

Multi-family Housing Meeting #4

Why Multi-family Apartments

Business Growth & Limited Housing

Planning

Why a large apartment vs a smaller unit rental

Windom Comprehensive Plan Review

The Windom Comprehensive Plan is an official public document adopted by the Windom City Council as a guide to decision-making.  The Plan presents a general concept for the future land uses. 

Overarching Vision

  1. Recognize that growth happens over time, and that all neighborhoods are on a continuum of improvement.  City policies and regulations need to be flexible to allow for change and growth. 
  2. Incorporate Health In All Policies into City planning and land use decisions. 
  3. Encourage new development without large expenditures for infrastructure (infill projects). 
  4. Enhance, Market, Promote – incorporate into all City planning.

Feedback regarding the Windom Comprehnsive Plan can be directed to Drew Hage (drew.hage@windommn.com)

 

Windom Comprehesive Plan_Public Review

Future Land Use Map – 2018

 

“Growing Our Own” Regional Event Nov. 8th

You are invited to help the City of Windom plan projects around “Growing Our Own” and working together to address child poverty.  Half of the kids in Windom under the age of 5 live in poverty. 

Would you like to attend the second regional “Grow Our Own” Summit in Marshall on November 8th from 9am to 4pm?  

This is an opportunity for community members to work together to address child poverty, plan projects in our community, and to help all of our kids to have a chance to reach their full potential.  My goal is to have a minimum of 15 community members from Windom attend the event.  The City and School are coordinating a ride-share to the event.  You are welcome to ride with us to the event.  Please let me know if you have any questions.

Event Overview
Too many southwest Minnesota kids aren’t getting the best start to life. We’re working to change that. Join the Southwest Initiative Foundation as we support our kids and the communities they call home. These kids are our future employees, community leaders, homeowners, volunteers and taxpayers. We believe that our region’s economy depends on their success.

During the summit, you’ll learn and be inspired to take action that will benefit youth, as well as your own business, organization, school, community or family.

Who should attend?

  • Employers and business leaders
  • Civic, community and nonprofit leaders
  • Educators and service providers
  • Elected officials
  • Interested individuals

This event is open to the public. Groups of people representing all areas of your community are encouraged to attend together!

  1. Get registered! Summit registration is now open.

Consumer Confidence Report

Windom

2018 Drinking Water Report

This report contains important information about your drinking water. Have someone translate it for you, or speak with someone who understands it.

Información importante.  Si no la entiende, haga que alguien se la traduzca ahora.

Making Safe Drinking Water

Your drinking water comes from a groundwater source: eight wells ranging from 87 to 142 feet deep, that draw water from the Quaternary Buried Unconfined, Quaternary Buried Artesian and Quaternary Water Table aquifers.

Windom works hard to provide you with safe and reliable drinking water that meets federal and state water quality requirements. The purpose of this report is to provide you with information on your drinking water and how to protect our precious water resources.

Contact Mike Haugen, Water & Wastewater Superintendent, at 507-831-6138 or Mike.Haugen@windommn.com if you have questions about Windom’s drinking water. You can also ask for information about how you can take part in decisions that may affect water quality.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sets safe drinking water standards. These standards limit the amounts of specific contaminants allowed in drinking water. This ensures that tap water is safe to drink for most people. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates the amount of certain contaminants in bottled water. Bottled water must provide the same public health protection as public tap water.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1‑800‑426‑4791.

Windom Monitoring Results

This report contains our monitoring results from January 1 to December 31, 2018.

We work with the Minnesota Department of Health to test drinking water for more than 100 contaminants. In recent years, we found one or more contaminants with levels above the Environmental Protection Agency’s limits. We found some other contaminants in small amounts, but they were below the Environmental Protection Agency’s limits.

Learn more by visiting the Minnesota Department of Health’s webpage Basics of Monitoring and Testing of Drinking Water in Minnesota (https://www.health.state.mn.us/communities/environment/water/factsheet/sampling.html).

How to Read the Water Quality Data Tables

The tables below show the contaminants we found last year or the most recent time we sampled for that contaminant. They also show the levels of those contaminants and the Environmental Protection Agency’s limits. Substances that we tested for but did not find are not included in the tables.

We sample for some contaminants less than once a year because their levels in water are not expected to change from year to year. If we found any of these contaminants the last time we sampled for them, we included them in the tables below with the detection date.

We may have done additional monitoring for contaminants that are not included in the Safe Drinking Water Act. To request a copy of these results, call the Minnesota Department of Health at 651-201-4700 or 1-800-818-9318 between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Definitions

  • AL (Action Level): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
  • EPA: Environmental Protection Agency
  • MCL (Maximum contaminant level): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
  • MCLG (Maximum contaminant level goal): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
  • Level 1 Assessment: A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.
  • Level 2 Assessment: A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.
  • MRDL (Maximum residual disinfectant level): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
  • MRDLG (Maximum residual disinfectant level goal): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
  • NA (Not applicable): Does not apply.
  • NTU (Nephelometric Turbidity Units): A measure of the cloudiness of the water (turbidity).
  • pCi/l (picocuries per liter): A measure of radioactivity.
  • ppb (parts per billion): One part per billion in water is like one drop in one billion drops of water, or about one drop in a swimming pool. ppb is the same as micrograms per liter (μg/l).
  • ppm (parts per million): One part per million is like one drop in one million drops of water, or about one cup in a swimming pool. ppm is the same as milligrams per liter (mg/l).
  • PWSID: Public water system identification.
  • TT (Treatment Technique): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
  • Variances and Exemptions: State or EPA permission not to meet an MCL or a treatment technique under certain conditions.

Monitoring Results – Regulated Substances

LEAD AND COPPER – Tested at customer taps.

Contaminant (Date, if sampled in previous year)

EPA’s Action Level

EPA’s Ideal Goal (MCLG)

90% of Results Were Less Than

Number of Homes with High Levels

Violation

Typical Sources

Copper (07/31/18)

90% of homes less than 1.3 ppm

0 ppm

1.47 ppm

4 out of 20

YES

Corrosion of household plumbing.

Lead (07/31/18)

90% of homes less than 15 ppb

0 ppb

0 ppb

0 out of 20

NO

Corrosion of household plumbing.

 

 

INORGANIC & ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS – Tested in drinking water.

Contaminant (Date, if sampled in previous year)

EPA’s Limit (MCL)

EPA’s Ideal Goal (MCLG)

Highest Average or Highest Single Test Result

Range of Detected Test Results

Violation

Typical Sources

Nitrate

10.4 ppm

10 ppm

0.62 ppm

N/A

NO

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

 

CONTAMINANTS RELATED TO DISINFECTION – Tested in drinking water.

Substance (Date, if sampled in previous year)

EPA’s Limit (MCL or MRDL)

EPA’s Ideal Goal (MCLG or MRDLG)

Highest Average or Highest Single Test Result

Range of Detected Test Results

Violation

Typical Sources

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

80 ppb

N/A

20.6 ppb

N/A

NO

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA)

60 ppb

N/A

8 ppb

N/A

NO

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

Total Chlorine

4.0 ppm

4.0 ppm

1.16 ppm

0.47 – 1.80 ppm

NO

Water additive used to control microbes.

Total HAA refers to HAA5

 

OTHER SUBSTANCES – Tested in drinking water.

Substance (Date, if sampled in previous year)

EPA’s Limit (MCL)

EPA’s Ideal Goal (MCLG)

Highest Average or Highest Single Test Result

Range of Detected Test Results

Violation

Typical Sources

Fluoride

4.0 ppm

4.0 ppm

0.76 ppm

0.66 – 0.74 ppm

NO

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive to promote strong teeth.

 

 

Potential Health Effects and Corrective Actions (If Applicable)

Copper: Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson’s disease should consult their personal doctor.

 

Copper: We are in exceedance of the action level for copper.  Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress.  Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage.  People with Wilson’s Disease should consult their personal doctor.  In response to this issue, we performed a corrosion control study and/or have taken actions to make the water less likely to absorb materials such as copper from your plumbing.

Some People Are More Vulnerable to Contaminants in Drinking Water

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. The developing fetus and therefore pregnant women may also be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water. These people or their caregivers should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1‑800‑426‑4791.

Learn More about Your Drinking Water

Drinking Water Sources

Minnesota’s primary drinking water sources are groundwater and surface water. Groundwater is the water found in aquifers beneath the surface of the land. Groundwater supplies 75 percent of Minnesota’s drinking water. Surface water is the water in lakes, rivers, and streams above the surface of the land. Surface water supplies 25 percent of Minnesota’s drinking water.

Contaminants can get in drinking water sources from the natural environment and from people’s daily activities. There are five main types of contaminants in drinking water sources.

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Sources include sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, pets, and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants include salts and metals from natural sources (e.g. rock and soil), oil and gas production, mining and farming operations, urban stormwater runoff, and wastewater discharges.
  • Pesticides and herbicides are chemicals used to reduce or kill unwanted plants and pests. Sources include agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and commercial and residential properties.
  • Organic chemical contaminants include synthetic and volatile organic compounds. Sources include industrial processes and petroleum production, gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants such as radium, thorium, and uranium isotopes come from natural sources (e.g. radon gas from soils and rock), mining operations, and oil and gas production.

The Minnesota Department of Health provides information about your drinking water source(s) in a source water assessment, including:

  • How Windom is protecting your drinking water source(s);
  • Nearby threats to your drinking water sources;
  • How easily water and pollution can move from the surface of the land into drinking water sources, based on natural geology and the way wells are constructed.

Find your source water assessment at Source Water Assessments (https://www.health.state.mn.us/communities/environment/water/swp/swa) or call 651-201-4700 or 1-800-818-9318 between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Lead in Drinking Water

You may be in contact with lead through paint, water, dust, soil, food, hobbies, or your job. Coming in contact with lead can cause serious health problems for everyone. There is no safe level of lead. Babies, children under six years, and pregnant women are at the highest risk.

Lead is rarely in a drinking water source, but it can get in your drinking water as it passes through lead service lines and your household plumbing system. Windom provides high quality drinking water, but it cannot control the plumbing materials used in private buildings.

Read below to learn how you can protect yourself from lead in drinking water.

  1. Let the water run for 30-60 seconds before using it for drinking or cooking if the water has not been turned on in over six hours. If you have a lead service line, you may need to let the water run longer. A service line is the underground pipe that brings water from the main water pipe under the street to your home.
    • You can find out if you have a lead service line by contacting your public water system, or you can check by following the steps at: https://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/06/24/npr-find-lead-pipes-in-your-home
    • The only way to know if lead has been reduced by letting it run is to check with a test. If letting the water run does not reduce lead, consider other options to reduce your exposure.
  2. Use cold water for drinking, making food, and making baby formula. Hot water releases more lead from pipes than cold water.
  3. Test your water. In most cases, letting the water run and using cold water for drinking and cooking should keep lead levels low in your drinking water. If you are still concerned about lead, arrange with a laboratory to test your tap water. Testing your water is important if young children or pregnant women drink your tap water.
  4. Treat your water if a test shows your water has high levels of lead after you let the water run.

Learn more:

 

Home Water Treatment

The Pros and Cons of Home Water Softening

When considering whether to use a water softener, contact your public water system to find out if you have hard water. Many systems treat for hardness, making water softeners unnecessary.

Water softeners are a water treatment device. They remove water hardness (dissolved calcium and magnesium). Water softeners must be installed and maintained properly to be safe and effective. Learn more at Home Water Softening (https://www.health.state.mn.us/communities/environment/water/factsheet/softening.html).

The benefits of soft water include:

▪            Increased efficiency for soaps and detergents.

▪            Reduction in mineral staining on fixtures and in pipes.

▪            A potential increase in the lifespan of water heaters.

The drawbacks of soft water include:

▪            Operation and maintenance costs.

▪            More sodium. People on low-sodium diets should consult a doctor if they plan to regularly consume softened water.

▪            The production of salt brine as a byproduct. This can have negative effects at wastewater treatment plants and on ecosystems. Reduce the amount of salt brine used or install a salt-free system.

 

 

 

 

New Utility Rates

Water Rates: 2018 rate

Residential, Commercial, Prime Pork & Windom Wash                                 

Minimums                               $15.81                         

1-3,740 gallons             $1.68 per 1,000 gallons

3,741-7,480 gallons       $3.83 per 1,000 gallons

Over 7,481 gallons        $4.90 per 1,000 gallons

City of Bingham Lake 

Minimums                               $17.39

1-3,740 gallons             $1.85 per 1,000 gallons

3,741-7,480 gallons      $4.21 per 1,000 gallons

Over 7,481 gallons        $5.39 per 1,000 gallons

Poet                            

5,000,000                     $3.88 per 1,000 gallons

40,000,000 reserve     $1.44 per 1,000 gallons (full price for any gallons pumped)

Red Rock Rural Water

                                          $2.72 per 1,000 gallons

Sewer Rates: 2018

Residential:                 

Minimum Charge        $31.05

                                        $1.55/1,000 gallons

Rental Units                 $31.05                                                        

Sewer Only                             

Apartments                 $34.16

Homes                          $38.81

Commercial/Bingham Lake:                           

Minimum Charge         $31.05

                        .                $4.97/1,000 gallons

Sewer Only                     $41.40

Fish Lake

Minimum Charge         $34.16

                                         $5.46/1,000 gallons

 

ELECTRIC RATES – 2018

  1. Residential Service

APPLICABLE TO:  Residential customers for all domestic uses in single-family dwellings and individually-metered apartments within the service territory of the City of Windom Electric Utility and within the City limits of Windom.

SERVICE AVAILABLE:  Single-phase, 60 hertz, 120/240 volt, 400 amp max., 3-wire, single meter.

MONTHLY RATE:

Billing Year

2016

2017

2018

Customer Charge No kwh

$5.70 Per Meter

$8.70 Per Meter

$12.00 Per Meter

Energy Charge All kwh

$0.079 Per kwh

$0.079 Per kwh

$0.079 Per kwh

    Power Cost Adjustment: The rate shown above is subject to a Power Cost Adjustment. (See Exhibit “A” Power Cost Adjustment Rider)                                          

PROMPT PAYMENT PROVISIONS:  All charges are net.  If the bill is not paid by the monthly due date, a late payment charge of 5 percent of the balance due shall apply. 

SALES TAX:  Sales tax to be added to all electric bills so as to be in compliance with the provisions of the laws of the State of Minnesota.

  1. Out-of-City Service

APPLICABLE TO:  Residential customers within the service territory of the City of Windom Electric Utility and outside of the City limits of Windom.

SERVICE AVAILABLE:  Single-phase, 60 hertz, 120/240 volt, 400 amp max., 3-wire, single meter.

MONTHLY RATE:

Billing Year

2016

2017

2018

Customer Charge No kwh

$14.00 Per Meter

$19.00 Per Meter

$24.00 Per Meter

Energy Charge All kwh

$0.079 Per kwh

$0.079 Per kwh

$0.079 Per kwh

 

Power Cost Adjustment: The rate shown above is subject to a Power Cost Adjustment. (See Exhibit “A” Power Cost Adjustment Rider)                                          

PROMPT PAYMENT PROVISIONS:  All charges are net.  If the bill is not paid by the monthly due date, a late payment charge of 5 percent of the balance due shall apply.

SALES TAX:  Sales tax to be added to all electric bills so as to be in compliance with the provisions of the laws of the State of Minnesota.

  1. Commercial Service

APPLICABLE TO:  Any commercial, industrial, mulit-family single meter apartments, municipal (City), or farm load within the service territory of the City of Windom Electric Utility for all purposes, where the maximum monthly demand is less than 50 K.W.

SERVICE AVAILABLE:  Single-phase, 60 hertz, 120/240 volt, 400 amp max., 3-wire, single meter; or three-phase, 60 hertz, 240/120V, 208Y/120V, or 480Y/277V, 4-wire, single meter. 

MONTHLY RATE:

Billing Year

Description

2016

2017

2018

Customer Charge No kwh

Single Phase

$15.00 Per Meter

$18.00 Per Meter

$21.00 Per Meter

 

Three Phase

$20.00 Per Meter

$24.00 Per Meter

$29.00 Per Meter

Energy Charge kwh

First 8000

$0.086 Per kwh

$0.087 Per kwh

$0.088 Per kwh

 

Over 8001

$0.081 Per kwh

$0.082 Per kwh

$0.083 Per kwh

                       Power Cost Adjustment: The rate shown above is subject to a Power Cost Adjustment. (See Exhibit “A” Power Cost Adjustment Rider)                                          

PROMPT PAYMENT PROVISIONS:  All charges are net.  If the bill is not paid by the monthly due date, a late payment charge of 5 percent of the balance due shall apply.

SALES TAX:  Sales tax to be added to all electric bills so as to be in compliance with the provisions of the laws of the State of Minnesota.

  1. Municipal Service & Street Lighting (This Class will become Street Lighting only in 2018. All other Customers remaining in this class will be moved to the Commercial Customers)

APPLICABLE TO:  Any City of Windom owned facilities, where the maximum monthly demand is less than 50 K.W.

SERVICE AVAILABLE:  Single-phase, 60 hertz, 120/240 volt, 400 amp max., 3-wire, single meter; or three-phase, 60 hertz, 240/120V, 208Y/120V, or 480Y/277V, 4-wire, single meter. 

MONTHLY RATE:

Billing Year

2016

2017

2018

Customer Charge No kwh

$9.00 Per Meter

$16.00 Per Meter

Move to Commercial

Energy Charge All kwh

$0.076 Per kwh

$0.081 Per kwh

Move to Commercial

Street Lighting kwh only

$0.080 Per kwh

$0.087 Per kwh

$0.095 Per kwh

                       Power Cost Adjustment: The rate shown above is subject to a Power Cost Adjustment. (See Exhibit “A” Power Cost Adjustment Rider)                                          

PROMPT PAYMENT PROVISIONS:  All charges are net.  If the bill is not paid by the monthly due date, a late payment charge of 5 percent of the balance due shall apply.

SALES TAX:  Sales tax to be added to all electric bills so as to be in compliance with the provisions of the laws of the State of Minnesota.

  1. Industrial Service

APPLICABLE TO:  Any commercial, industrial, municipal (City), or farm load within the City of Windom Electric Utility service territory, for all purposes, where the metered maximum demand in any one month exceeds 50KW.

SERVICE AVAILABLE:  Single-phase, 60 hertz, 120/240 volt, 400 amp max., 3-wire, single meter or three-phase, 240/120 V, 208 Y/120 V, or 480 Y/277 V, 4-wire.  Special voltages may be provided at the discretion of the Utility.  Utility furnishes only one transformer bank and/or one meter.

MONTHLY RATE:

Billing Year

2016

2017

2018

Customer Charge No kwh

$25.00 Per Meter

$35.00 Per Meter

$45.00 Per Meter

Energy Charge All kwh

$0.060 Per kwh

$0.053 Per kwh

$0.046 Per kwh

Demand Charge All KW

$6.95 Per KW

$10.10 Per KW

$13.30 Per KW

Minimum Demand %

50%

40%

30%

 METERED DEMAND:  The metered demand for any month shall be the maximum kilowatt demand established by the consumer for any thirty-minute interval during the month as indicated or recorded by a demand meter.

BILLING DEMAND:  The billing demand shall be the maximum measured thirty-minute integrated demand in the billing month, but not less than the percentage shown in table above, of the maximum thirty-minute demand established in any of the twelve preceding months.

PRIMARY METERING:  For large customers (at the option of the City), metering may be on the high voltage or primary side of transformer, in which case a discount of 2% of the monthly Energy, Demand and Power Cost Adjustment will be allowed. NOTE: Primary Metered customers are required to own all equipment past the meter including Transformers, High Voltage Lines and Related Equipment and are responsible for the maintance and operation of equipment.

PROMPT PAYMENT PROVISIONS:  All charges are net.  If the bill is not paid by the monthly due date, a late payment charge of 5 percent of the balance due shall apply.

SALES TAX:  Sales tax to be added to all electric bills so as to be in compliance with the provisions of the laws of the State of Minnesota.

  1. Security Lighting

APPLICABLE TO:  Available for year around illumination for area and security lighting             by electric lamps in luminaries supported on wood poles, where the facilities for this service       are         furnished  by the Municipal Utility. (Availability to be determined by the Utility.)

            MONTHLY RATE

Billing Year

2016

2017

2018

100Watt

$8.00 Per Month

$8.00 Per Month

$8.00 Per Month

400Watt

$18.00 Per Month

$18.00 Per Month

$18.00 Per Month

EXHIBIT “A” – POWER SUPPLY COST ADJUSTMENT RIDER

(APPLICABLE TO ELECTRIC UTILITY RATES 2016 – 1)

There shall be added to or deducted from the net monthly bill $ .00001 per kilowatt hour for each $.00001 increase above or below the estimated monthly average new cost of power supply delivered to the customer, i.e., power supply from Central Minnesota Municipal Power Agency plus local production plant costs of providing for standby and emergency services.

Purchased power bills from Central Minnesota Municipal Power Agency for power, energy, and

transmission service and/or any local production plant operating costs or operating costs from any additional suppliers shall be added together to arrive at total cost of power supply and that combined cost shall then be divided by the net kilowatt hours billed to the consumer to arrive at average net cost of power supply.

City of Windom – Paperless Billing!

The City of Windom/WindomNet now offers its customers the ability to view and pay your accounts online.

Sign up for paperless bills!

Register your account at https://billpay.windom-mn.com/billpay.  You will need your account number, current invoice number, and the total amount due.   You will then create a user name and password.

 

Getting your bill in the mail can be complicated and timely.  When you sign-up for paperless bills, you will receive an email notification with a link to your bill.  Your bill is ready for viewing by the 8th of the month.  Sign up for web bills only by locating it in the Manage Account Menu as an Invoice preference.

 

Pay your bills online!  

Set up a one-time payment or a recurring monthly payment on the 27th of each month.  Pay with your checking, savings, or credit card account.   (Credit card payments will incur a 3% fee).  

Autopay signup